inauguration with a reading by V.W. To the lighthouse
thanks to Ana, Zehra, David and Elsa inauguration with a reading by V.W. To the lighthouse
thanks to Ana, Zehra, David and Elsa inauguration with a reading by V.W. To the lighthouse
thanks to Ana, Zehra, David and Elsa inauguration with a reading by V.W. To the lighthouse
thanks to Ana, Zehra, David and Elsa inauguration with a reading by V.W. To the lighthouse
thanks to Ana, Zehra, David and Elsa inauguration with a reading by V.W. To the lighthouse
thanks to Ana, Zehra, David and Elsa

inauguration with a reading by V.W. To the lighthouse

thanks to Ana, Zehra, David and Elsa

fisherman

shelter as a site for alliance

"…the broad existential and humanist claim that, well, everyone is precarious.But once we ask what this means, or what forms precarity assumes, we see that we have already left the existential domain to consider our social existence as bodily beings who depend upon one another for SHELTER and sustenance and who, therefore, are at risk of statelessness, homelessness and destitution under unjust and unequal political conditions……our precarity is to a large extent dependent upon the organisation of economic and social relationships, the presence or absence of sustaining infrastructures and social and political institutions, and modes of struggling for them that produce and sustain alliances. "

J. Butler in: Bodily Vulnerability, Coalitions and Street Politics

SALT and Aerogel

SALT and Aerogel

Criteria for selection of materials and site

The idea of the lighthouse as a sculpture is drawn from the 1927 novel by Virginia Woolf. In her book, the lighthouse represents a place for observation, rest, and the consideration of human or social relations. In the natural landscape, one can find solace from subjective struggles and joys while partaking in the vistas and views along the coastline. While adding the functional shelter and resting aspect, the birdwatchers stopping and resting (Virginia Woolf was a birdwatcher too) is taken from what the location is actually: a place and walk for people who want to watch birds and walk dogs.

The aim is to connect to the geography of the Lymington-Keyhaven Nature Reserve and esp the salt marshes not only as a historical site, but also as a location for formal and aesthetic reflection. Remnants from the salt industry’s past have come to shape the cultural history of the Salterns Marsh and the Pennington Marsh, as well as the physical terrain of its coastline. The salt collected there has been fundamental for both human life and commercial trading in the Lymington region. Of course, salt has been of value to humanity for many centuries, but aerogel—a solid material artificially produced from gel (and originating from stone)—connects to humanity’s future rather than to its past. Aerogel is the lightest material, and has the highest insulation capabilities, of all the materials we have so far explored and developed on earth. Its high energy and strength, luminesence, and ultra-light weight account for its tremendous value. Nevertheless, its physical qualities are visually quite similar to that of salt, and even when viewed in its original form, it could be mistaken for a grain of salt. Because the future is dependant on energy and energy management, aerogel has become, much like salt, one of the most valuable tools and trading materials we have today. Here the research and fascination with aerogel comes from a very sculptural consideration of the material and how it interacts with light, as well as an interest in paying tribute to new technological developments and the sustainability of the environment and in dialogue with. While also emphasizing the lightest in weight can be the strongest. Aerogel is called frozen smoke and it is the material of another dimension because of the following :

aerogel is 95% air 

only 3 times heavier than air

and the pores are 1000 times thiner than a spiderwebthread

gram of areogel however has the surface of a soccer place

 

 

 

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sourcematerial and imagecollection

"Araya" is an old natural salt mine located in a peninsula in northeastern Venezuela which was still, by 1959, being exploited manually five hundred years after its discovery by the Spanish. Margot Benacerraf captures in images, the life of the "salineros" and their archaic methods of work before their definite disappearance with the arrival of the industrial exploitation.

Winner of the International Critics Prize at Cannes in 1959. 

An acclaimed pioneer feminist filmmaker, Benacerraf has been an important inspiration and mentor to artists, writers and filmmakers around the world. After her films jumpstarted international interest in Venezuelan cinema and helped launch the New Latin Cinema, she went on to found Venezuela’s Cineteca Nacional and Fundavisual Latina — institutions dedicated to restoring films and bringing cinema from around the world to her native country.

 

"The closer I came to Araya, the closer I felt to the people. I made my films with a lot of love." - Margot Benacerraf, 1996